News

Arriving April 19, 2018, International scholar Dr. Rachel Baker to spend 3 months at C2E2

Rachel Baker is Professor of Health Economics and Director of the Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health at Glasgow Caledonian University.  Before moving to Glasgow in 2010, she worked at the University of Newcastle where she completed her PhD funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and her Postdoctoral Fellowship funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

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Risk factors for addiction among patients receiving prescribed opioids: a systematic review protocol

Cragg A, Hau JP, Woo SA, Liu C, Doyle-Waters MM, Hohl CM. Risk factors for addiction among patients receiving prescribed opioids: a systematic review protocol. Syst Rev. 2017 Dec 28;6(1):265.

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Aromatase inhibitors are associated with a higher fracture risk than tamoxifen: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Tseng OL, Spinelli JJ, Gotay CC, Ho WY, McBride ML, Dawes MG. Aromatase inhibitors are associated with a higher fracture risk than tamoxifen: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis. 2018 Apr;10(4) 71–90.

Abstract

Background: In this paper, our aim was to systematically evaluate published evidence of bone fracture risk associated with tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors in women aged 65 and under, and diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer.

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Congratulations to C2E2's Corrine Hohl on receiving the Killam Research Fellowship Award!

C2E2 Scientist Corinne Hohl was awarded a UBC Killam Research Fellowship to study medication safety in Nepal, one of the poorest countries in the world where the healthcare available to most is inadequate.

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Characterizing Undiagnosed Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Johnson KM, Bryan S, Ghanbarian S, Sin DD, Sadatsafavi M. Characterizing undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Respiratory Research. 2018;19:26. doi.org/10.1186/s12931-018-0731-1

Background

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C2E2's Sarah Munro talks about BC’s High Rate of Repeat C-section Prompts New Online Decision Tool for Women

BC has the highest rate of caesarean births in Canada. Here, 34 per cent of babies are delivered by C-section versus the national average of 28 per cent. To put those percentages in context, the World Health Organization says an ideal C-section rate is between 10 and 15 per cent. When it comes to repeat C-sections, BC rates are also very high, and rising, even though vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC) is considered safer for both mom and baby in low-risk pregnancies.

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$9.7 million awarded to kidney transplantation research

Genome Canada has awarded $9.7 million to a project co-led by researchers at Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) that could change the face of transplant care. The funding will support a groundbreaking study—co-led by Dr. Paul Keown and Dr. Stirling Bryan from University of British Columbia, Dr. Ruth Sapir-Pichhadze from McGill University and Dr. Timothy Caulfield from University of Alberta—that aims to increase kidney transplant success rates by 50 per cent and save around $1-billion in health care costs over the next 15 years.

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